Institutskolloquium des IPP

Rückblick auf bereits gehaltene Vorträge

The SPARC tokamak: the high-field path to fusion energy

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 29.01.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 15:00 - 16:30
  • Vortragender: Dr. Robert Granetz
  • Dr. Granetz is a principal research scientist at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center. His main areas of research include MHD equilibrium and stability, disruptions, and disruption mitigation studies, both on the Alcator series of high-field tokamaks at MIT, and through collaborations on other major tokamaks around the world. Dr. Granetz has also taught graduate student courses in plasma physics and fusion for the Physics Department and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department at MIT. He spent 2.5 years in Europe as a visiting scientist on the Joint European Torus (JET). He has also participated extensively on ITER advisory groups on MHD and disruption issues. Currently, Dr. Granetz is also part of a privately funded program at MIT to incorporate high-temperature superconductors into high field magnets for use in the SPARC tokamak, as well as future tokamak and stellarator reactors. Dr. Granetz received his undergraduate and graduate degrees at MIT, doing his doctoral thesis research on the early Alcator tokamaks
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Electrification and circularity - a plasma chemistry perspective

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 12.02.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Gerard van Rooij
  • Gerard van Rooij is full professor in plasma chemistry at Maastricht University and in sustainable plasma chemistry at the Eindhoven University of Technology. He obtained his MSc in Physics at the Eindhoven University of Technology (specialization Plasma Physics) and received his PhD degree at the University of Amsterdam for his research on macromolecular mass spectrometry that he performed at AMOLF. As a project leader for low temperature plasma physics, he pioneered the scientific basis of the unique devices for plasma surface interaction studies within DIFFER and participated in the research programs of the major international facilities for fusion research to study the role of plasma chemistry therein. Since 2012, he researches plasma activation of chemical reactions to aid storage of sustainable energy in chemical potential energy for its integration in other sectors such as transport and chemical industry, work that he currently continues part-time at DIFFER. In 2020, he was appointed to head of the Circular Chemical Engineering department. From his role at Maastricht, Van Rooij participates in various program lines connected to the Brightsite consortium that aims at providing climate neutral solutions to the chemical industry.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

The brightest explosions in the Universe: gamma-ray bursts and soft-gamma repeaters

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 19.02.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Dmitry Svinkin
  • Dr. Dmitry Svinkin, Research Scientist, Ioffe Institute Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics Dr. Svinkin is the deputy principal investigator of Russian-US Konus-Wind experiment and the main researcher of the Interplanetary network (a collaboration of space-based instruments for gamma-ray burst observations). His main areas of research include multiwavelength observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), soft gamma-repeaters (SGRs), and solar flares. Recently he has been participating in electromagnetic counterpart searches of gravitational waves in collaboration with LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave observatory teams and searches for gamma-ray counterparts of fast optical transients in collaboration with the Zwicky Transient Facility (Palomar Observatory) and the MASTER robotic telescope network (MSU). His main results include localization of short gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A accompanied by gravitational waves (ApJL 848, 12, 2017; arXiv: 1710.05833) and analyses and searches for SGR extragalactic giant flares (Nature 589, 211, 2021; arXiv:2101.05144). Dr. Svinkin is also involved in development of GRB dedicated space-based instruments at Ioffe Institute.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 2
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

From Power Exhaust to Dilution & Radiation Collapses: Impurity transport and radiation physics in W7-X

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 26.02.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Felix Reimold
  • Felix Reimold is leading the impurity transport and radiation physics group at the Max-Planck Insitute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald. He studied physics at the Karls-Ruprechts University of Heidelberg and the Technical University of Munich. Mr. Reimold graduated at the Technical University of Munich with his PhD thesis focusing on experiments and numerical modeling of power exhaust scenarios with impurity seeding in ASEDX Upgrade. During his PhD he won a Eurofusion Researcher Grant and was coordinating power exhaust experiments as a scientific coordinator in the Eurofusion MST-framework. In 2017 he became part of the ITPA group on divertor and SOL physics. Mr. Reimold worked at/with various institutions, including the Max-Planck Insitutes for Plasma Physics in Garching and Greifswald, the Plasma Science and Fusion Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston and the Forschungszentrum Jülich. Currently, Mr. Reimold is responsible for the divertor bolometry system at W7-X, leads the topical group on impurity transport and radiation physics, and coordinates the EMC3-modeling user group at W7-X. His research interests include spectroscopy, bolometry, impurity transport and power/particle exhaust both in modeling and experiment.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Progress and Challenges in TAE’s Quest Towards a Practical FRC-Based Fusion Reactor

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 05.03.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 16:00 - 17:30
  • Vortragender: Dr. Erik H. Trask
  • Erik H. Trask leads the Experimental Section in the Fusion Division at TAE Technologies, Inc. He is a graduate of UC Irvine, having received his doctorate in 2010 for studies of fluctuation-induced transport on the Irvine Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). He has studied in the P-24 group at Los Alamos National Laboratory and been a member of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics (DPP) since 2003. He has been a frequent presenter of DPP meetings, and has served as session chair. As part of FESAC and associated subcommittee, he worked to produce the recent Long Range Strategic Planning report for the Department of Energy FES division. At TAE, Dr. Trask managed a cryogenic hydrogen pellet fueling system, developed RF sniffer probes, served as chief operator and has been a frequent experimental Session Leader on the C-2W device at TAE. He was instrumental in the development of a shot scheduler system where batches of complete experimental machine settings are prepared prior to run days allowing efficient queueing of experiments. He participated in development of and coauthored a paper on machine optimization techniques in collaboration with Google. He has twice won the award for yearly achievement, once for leadership in joint research with Google and once for assisting with the design and construction of the ~100GW pulsed power system on C-2W. Current responsibilities include managing operational activities, ensuring data analysis and processing pipelines are running well, and designing and scheduling experiments. His research interests include development of plasma models, studies of wave heating schemes in over-dense plasma, implementing efficient search techniques in high dimensions, and high power rotating magnetic field plasma sources.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Modelling the 6D near-Earth space: Aurorae and other plasma dynamics

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 19.03.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragende: Prof. Minna Palmroth
  • Minna Palmroth is a professor in computational space physics at the University of Helsinki and director of the Finnish Centre of Excellence in Research of Sustainable Space. Her particular area of interest is magnetospheric physics. She is a graduate of the University of Helsinki (MSc 1999, PhD 2003). She made her postdoc in the Finnish Meteorological Institute, where she led the department later and became the research professor. Professor Palmroth specializes on computational (space) plasma physics, concentrating on plasma kinetic, shock waves, and magnetic reconnections. She developed a global hybrid-Vlasov simulator “Vlasiator”. Professor Palmroth is a distinguished scientist, who is recognized by multiple grants and fellowships. She was the Academy research fellow and twice winner of the ERC grant.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 10
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

The role of high-temperature superconducting wires for the energy transition

Institutskolloquium

Why We Should Be Scared of Hardware Trojans

Institutskolloquium

Global first-principle modelling for burning plasmas

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 21.05.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Alexey Mischenko
  • 1996-2002 : graduated Karazin National University, Kharkiv, Ukraine 2002-2005 : PhD in computational physics, IPP Greifswald, Otto Hahn Medal 2005-2009 : postdoc at IPP Greifswald, working on electromagnetic PIC codes since 2009 : staff at Stellarator Theory IPP Greifswald; 2012-2021 : participation in EUROfusion Enabling Research for energetic particles; starting 2021: PI of TSVV Task 10 (burning plasmas) topics of research: numerics and applicaiton of gyrokinetic PIC codes (Alfvenic instabilities in presence of fast particles, gyrokinetic modelling of MHD-type phenomena), zonal-flow dynamics in stellarators, gyrokinetic theory of pair plasmas (extensions to dipole geometry and non-neutral plasmas)
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
Realistic simulations of electromagnetic turbulence are of crucial importance to understand and predict behavior of burning plasmas before they become experimentally available. Burning plasmas are complex systems with multiple spatial and temporal scales. Electromagnetic turbulence is ubiquitous in such plasmas. It is the basic component of the ``scenery'' involving the fast-particle dynamics, the global Magneto-Hydrodynamical and Alfvenic activity, zonal flows, and transport. The saturation of the electromagnetic turbulence is a consequence of a complex interplay between these components. A single numerical first-principle framework, based on the global gyrokinetic electromagnetic formulation and including self-consistently all parts of the problem, is needed. An approach to this task based on the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes will be addressed in the presentation. Electromagnetic simulations are known to be very challenging for the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes because of the numerical stability issues related to the cancellation problem [1]. Such simulations are also very time consuming since the fast electron dynamics has to be resolved. We address the numerical stability problem using the pullback mitigation technique [2,3] for the cancellation problem. Very long simulation times normally required when the electron dynamics is resolved are substantially accelerated deploying GPUs. In our talk, we will discuss the challenges and describe results of the global gyrokinetic modelling in the electromagnetic regime. [1] Physics of Plasmas, 24(8):081206, 2017 [2] Physics of Plasmas, 21(9):092110, 2014 [3] Computer Physics Communications, 238:194–202, 2019 [mehr]

Pest und Corona: Pfade der Öffentlichen Gesundheit

Institutskolloquium

Bound states in the continuum: from quantum mechanics to nanophotonics

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 06.08.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Andrey Bogdanov
  • Andrey Bogdanov is an assistant Professor at ITMO University (St Petersburg, Russia). He is the leader of the group “Theoretical Nanophotonic”. Andrey graduated with honor from St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University in 2009. In 2012 he got a Ph.D. degree in solid-state physics at the Ioffe Insitute. His scientific interest lies in the field of nanophotonics, nonlinear optics, nanoresonators, optical forces, surface electromagnetic waves, metasurfaces, and bound states in the continuum. Andrey Bogdanov has authored more than 100 journal papers some of them entered the 1% of the most cited papers in physics in 2020. He was awarded a number of different prized, scholarships, and grants including the “Young Scientist Award” from the European Optical Society, the Leonard Euler Prize, and the award for young scientists of the Russian Academy of Science. Andrey has a huge teaching experience. He gave his first lectures on mathematical physics being a bachelor's student. He is the author of three online courses with more than 20 000 participants. Now, Andrey is the head of the international Master's program on “Nanophotonics and Metamaterials” at ITMO University. Andrey is the chair of the annual international summer school on “Nanophotonics and Metamaterials”.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
Realistic simulations of electromagnetic turbulence are of crucial importance to understand and predict behavior of burning plasmas before they become experimentally available. Burning plasmas are complex systems with multiple spatial and temporal scales. Electromagnetic turbulence is ubiquitous in such plasmas. It is the basic component of the ``scenery'' involving the fast-particle dynamics, the global Magneto-Hydrodynamical and Alfvenic activity, zonal flows, and transport. The saturation of the electromagnetic turbulence is a consequence of a complex interplay between these components. A single numerical first-principle framework, based on the global gyrokinetic electromagnetic formulation and including self-consistently all parts of the problem, is needed. An approach to this task based on the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes will be addressed in the presentation. Electromagnetic simulations are known to be very challenging for the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes because of the numerical stability issues related to the cancellation problem [1]. Such simulations are also very time consuming since the fast electron dynamics has to be resolved. We address the numerical stability problem using the pullback mitigation technique [2,3] for the cancellation problem. Very long simulation times normally required when the electron dynamics is resolved are substantially accelerated deploying GPUs. In our talk, we will discuss the challenges and describe results of the global gyrokinetic modelling in the electromagnetic regime. [1] Physics of Plasmas, 24(8):081206, 2017 [2] Physics of Plasmas, 21(9):092110, 2014 [3] Computer Physics Communications, 238:194–202, 2019 [mehr]

The psychology of conspiracy theories

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 24.09.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragende: Prof. Karen Douglas
  • Karen Douglas is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Kent in the United Kingdom. She obtained her PhD from the Australian National University in 2000 and has worked in the United Kingdom for 20 years. She has been an associate editor and editor of several social psychology journals including the British Journal of Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, European Journal of Social Psychology, and the British Journal of Psychology. She is currently serving on the Executive Committee of the European Association of Social Psychology. To study the consequences of conspiracy theories, Karen has recently been awarded a five-year advanced grant of 2.5 million Euros from the European Research Council.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
What psychological factors drive the popularity of conspiracy theories, that explain significant events and circumstances as secret plots by malevolent groups? What are the psychological consequences of adopting these theories? In this talk, I will review research that attempts to answer these questions. First, I will outline research which suggests that belief in conspiracy theories is driven by psychological needs that can be characterised as epistemic (e.g., needing to reduce uncertainty), existential (e.g., needing to feel autonomous and in control) and social (e.g., needing to maintain a high level of self-esteem). I will then talk about some of the consequences of conspiracy theories for individuals' wellbeing and for society. [mehr]

Fundamental particle physics with high-power microwaves

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 01.10.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Akira Miyazaki
  • Akira studied plasma physics when he was an undergraduate student in the University of Tokyo from 2005, and joined LHC-CMS as a CERN summer student in 2009. During his master course, he studied particle physics at LHC-ATLAS in Tokyo. After the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, in collaboration with a gyrotron facility at Fukui University (FIR-FU), he tried to find an alternative and unique path to go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics with high-power microwaves. In 2014 at the University of Tokyo, he defended his PhD thesis about first direct measurement of positronium hyperfine structure using gyrotrons. He moved to CERN as a CERN research fellow and then was affiliated to the University of Manchester to work on response of superconductors against high-power microwaves. Since 2019, he has been working at Uppsala University as a staff researcher for superconducting particle accelerators. His present research interest is using high-power microwaves to understand objects written by either relativistic or non-relativistic quantum field theory, namely, new particle physics beyond the Standard Model and superconductors beyond the conventional theory. His research achievements include precision tests of quantum electrodynamics with high-power microwaves, investigation of surface resistance of thin-film superconductors, non-linear dynamics of trapped magnetic vortices in superconductors under strong microwaves, and superconducting accelerating cavities for protons and heavy ions. In parallel to these scientific researches, he has been leading several international projects on superconducting accelerators in Europe, such as HIE-ISOLDE, HL-LHC, and currently European Spallation Sources in Sweden. Recently, he is proposing a new international experiment for dark matter physics based on high-power microwaves.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
The Standard Model of particle physics was completed by discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. This model beautifully explains most of the experimental facts but does contradict with some important exceptions. One of the major issues of particle physics is lack of dark matter candidates in its present form, and therefore, lots of possible extensions beyond the Standard Model have been proposed, including super string theory. Such extensions naturally predict new particles which may very weakly interact with the ordinary particles in the Standard Model. Some of them can be dark matter candidates. Since an ordinary photon may couple with such hypothetical particles, new photon technology, in particular above 30 GHz, is a key to address such particles in unexplored parameter regions. In this colloquium, general introduction of this research field of particle physics will be presented, followed by two specific projects related to gyrotrons, originally developed for plasma heating and nuclear fusion. First, we will discuss precision measurement of atomic levels of positronium, a bound state of electron and position, by using gyrotrons. Secondly, direct search for new massive gauge bosons, often referred to as dark photons, with gyrotrons of frequency higher than 30 GHz, will be proposed. The latter project is under the preliminary consideration with Karlsruhe Institute for Technology to use their R&D gyrotron. In these applications for particle physics, a crucial engineering aspect is the ultimate frequency stability of gyrotrons with for example phase-lock loop and injection locking techniques. The impact of these new techniques to the fundamental physics will be described. Furthermore, ultimate limitation of classical electrodynamics for photon detection will be introduced with its remedy with superconducting quantum sensors, which is a hot topic in the particle physics community with a link to quantum computing technology. [mehr]

New developments in the use of bibliometrics in research evaluation

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 22.10.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Lutz Bornmann
  • Lutz Bornmann is a habilitated sociologist of science and works in the Administrative Headquarters of the Max Planck Society (Science Policy and Strategy Department). Besides his service activities for the Max Planck Society, he carries out research on the topic ‘research evaluation’. Here, his research interests include peer review, bibliometrics, and altmetrics. He is recipient of the Derek de Solla Price Memorial Medal in 2019. The medal is periodically awarded by the journal Scientometrics to scientists with outstanding contributions to the fields of quantitative studies of science.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
Today, bibliometrics is a standard instrument in research evaluation besides peer review. The instrument is used for assessing single researchers, research groups, institutions, countries etc. The presentation will focus on several aspects of the use of bibliometrics in research evaluation. After some basic information on bibliometrics in the first part (e.g., the difference between citizen and professional bibliometrics), the presentation will explain in more detail one of the most important type of indicators: field-normalized citation impact indicators. In the second part of the presentation, it will be shown how field-normalized citation impact indicators can be used to assess research of single researchers, institutions, and countries. In the final part, two web-based tools will be presented that can be used to assess (1) the distribution of institutional performance worldwide (see www.excellencemapping.net) and (2) the success of institutional collaboration activities worldwide (see www.excellence-networks.net). [mehr]

Ruptures in the box? Metallic melt pools, flying droplets and adhered dust in fusion devices

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 29.10.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragende: Prof. Svetlana Ratynskaia
  • Svetlana Ratynskaia is a Professor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm. Her research area is plasma physics with a focus on dusty / complex plasmas (https://www.kth.se/ee/spp/research/area/dusty-and-complex-plasmas-1.1016427) and plasma-material interactions (https://www.kth.se/ee/spp/research/area/plasma-material-interactions-1.1022875). Her research is supported by the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish National Space Agency, the ITER Organization, and the EUROfusion Consortium. She has published over 120 papers in international peer-reviewed journals, https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6712-3625.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
The interdisciplinary field of plasma material interactions encompasses all physical processes that lead to the exchange of particles, momentum and energy between plasmas and condensed matter bodies. Modelling of the interface between the plasma and the fusion reactor wall is a highly challenging task as the problem involves various aspects of disparate physics disciplines. On one side of ‘the border’, complicated plasma effects are dictated by classical electromagnetism. Near the interface, intense plasma-material interactions are governed by quantum mechanics. On the other side, the metallic melt (produced by incident heat loads) evolves according to the fluid mechanics laws. In addition to solid or liquid material boundaries surrounding plasmas, there are also dust particles, a by-product of plasma-surface interaction, whose remobilization from surfaces and collisions with the vessel are described by contact mechanics and impact mechanics. In this talk, we discuss some of the microscopic processes occurring on the plasma-material boundaries and modelling approaches for predictive studies of metallic plasma-facing component damage under energetic transient events, including the relevant issue of dust transport and in-vessel accumulation. [mehr]
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