Institutskolloquium des IPP 2021

The SPARC tokamak: the high-field path to fusion energy

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 29.01.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 15:00 - 16:30
  • Vortragender: Dr. Robert Granetz
  • Dr. Granetz is a principal research scientist at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center. His main areas of research include MHD equilibrium and stability, disruptions, and disruption mitigation studies, both on the Alcator series of high-field tokamaks at MIT, and through collaborations on other major tokamaks around the world. Dr. Granetz has also taught graduate student courses in plasma physics and fusion for the Physics Department and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department at MIT. He spent 2.5 years in Europe as a visiting scientist on the Joint European Torus (JET). He has also participated extensively on ITER advisory groups on MHD and disruption issues. Currently, Dr. Granetz is also part of a privately funded program at MIT to incorporate high-temperature superconductors into high field magnets for use in the SPARC tokamak, as well as future tokamak and stellarator reactors. Dr. Granetz received his undergraduate and graduate degrees at MIT, doing his doctoral thesis research on the early Alcator tokamaks
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Electrification and circularity - a plasma chemistry perspective

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 12.02.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Gerard van Rooij
  • Gerard van Rooij is full professor in plasma chemistry at Maastricht University and in sustainable plasma chemistry at the Eindhoven University of Technology. He obtained his MSc in Physics at the Eindhoven University of Technology (specialization Plasma Physics) and received his PhD degree at the University of Amsterdam for his research on macromolecular mass spectrometry that he performed at AMOLF. As a project leader for low temperature plasma physics, he pioneered the scientific basis of the unique devices for plasma surface interaction studies within DIFFER and participated in the research programs of the major international facilities for fusion research to study the role of plasma chemistry therein. Since 2012, he researches plasma activation of chemical reactions to aid storage of sustainable energy in chemical potential energy for its integration in other sectors such as transport and chemical industry, work that he currently continues part-time at DIFFER. In 2020, he was appointed to head of the Circular Chemical Engineering department. From his role at Maastricht, Van Rooij participates in various program lines connected to the Brightsite consortium that aims at providing climate neutral solutions to the chemical industry.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

The brightest explosions in the Universe: gamma-ray bursts and soft-gamma repeaters

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 19.02.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Dmitry Svinkin
  • Dr. Dmitry Svinkin, Research Scientist, Ioffe Institute Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics Dr. Svinkin is the deputy principal investigator of Russian-US Konus-Wind experiment and the main researcher of the Interplanetary network (a collaboration of space-based instruments for gamma-ray burst observations). His main areas of research include multiwavelength observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), soft gamma-repeaters (SGRs), and solar flares. Recently he has been participating in electromagnetic counterpart searches of gravitational waves in collaboration with LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave observatory teams and searches for gamma-ray counterparts of fast optical transients in collaboration with the Zwicky Transient Facility (Palomar Observatory) and the MASTER robotic telescope network (MSU). His main results include localization of short gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A accompanied by gravitational waves (ApJL 848, 12, 2017; arXiv: 1710.05833) and analyses and searches for SGR extragalactic giant flares (Nature 589, 211, 2021; arXiv:2101.05144). Dr. Svinkin is also involved in development of GRB dedicated space-based instruments at Ioffe Institute.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 2
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

From Power Exhaust to Dilution & Radiation Collapses: Impurity transport and radiation physics in W7-X

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 26.02.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Felix Reimold
  • Felix Reimold is leading the impurity transport and radiation physics group at the Max-Planck Insitute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald. He studied physics at the Karls-Ruprechts University of Heidelberg and the Technical University of Munich. Mr. Reimold graduated at the Technical University of Munich with his PhD thesis focusing on experiments and numerical modeling of power exhaust scenarios with impurity seeding in ASEDX Upgrade. During his PhD he won a Eurofusion Researcher Grant and was coordinating power exhaust experiments as a scientific coordinator in the Eurofusion MST-framework. In 2017 he became part of the ITPA group on divertor and SOL physics. Mr. Reimold worked at/with various institutions, including the Max-Planck Insitutes for Plasma Physics in Garching and Greifswald, the Plasma Science and Fusion Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston and the Forschungszentrum Jülich. Currently, Mr. Reimold is responsible for the divertor bolometry system at W7-X, leads the topical group on impurity transport and radiation physics, and coordinates the EMC3-modeling user group at W7-X. His research interests include spectroscopy, bolometry, impurity transport and power/particle exhaust both in modeling and experiment.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Progress and Challenges in TAE’s Quest Towards a Practical FRC-Based Fusion Reactor

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 05.03.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 16:00 - 17:30
  • Vortragender: Dr. Erik H. Trask
  • Erik H. Trask leads the Experimental Section in the Fusion Division at TAE Technologies, Inc. He is a graduate of UC Irvine, having received his doctorate in 2010 for studies of fluctuation-induced transport on the Irvine Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). He has studied in the P-24 group at Los Alamos National Laboratory and been a member of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics (DPP) since 2003. He has been a frequent presenter of DPP meetings, and has served as session chair. As part of FESAC and associated subcommittee, he worked to produce the recent Long Range Strategic Planning report for the Department of Energy FES division. At TAE, Dr. Trask managed a cryogenic hydrogen pellet fueling system, developed RF sniffer probes, served as chief operator and has been a frequent experimental Session Leader on the C-2W device at TAE. He was instrumental in the development of a shot scheduler system where batches of complete experimental machine settings are prepared prior to run days allowing efficient queueing of experiments. He participated in development of and coauthored a paper on machine optimization techniques in collaboration with Google. He has twice won the award for yearly achievement, once for leadership in joint research with Google and once for assisting with the design and construction of the ~100GW pulsed power system on C-2W. Current responsibilities include managing operational activities, ensuring data analysis and processing pipelines are running well, and designing and scheduling experiments. His research interests include development of plasma models, studies of wave heating schemes in over-dense plasma, implementing efficient search techniques in high dimensions, and high power rotating magnetic field plasma sources.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Modelling the 6D near-Earth space: Aurorae and other plasma dynamics

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 19.03.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragende: Prof. Minna Palmroth
  • Minna Palmroth is a professor in computational space physics at the University of Helsinki and director of the Finnish Centre of Excellence in Research of Sustainable Space. Her particular area of interest is magnetospheric physics. She is a graduate of the University of Helsinki (MSc 1999, PhD 2003). She made her postdoc in the Finnish Meteorological Institute, where she led the department later and became the research professor. Professor Palmroth specializes on computational (space) plasma physics, concentrating on plasma kinetic, shock waves, and magnetic reconnections. She developed a global hybrid-Vlasov simulator “Vlasiator”. Professor Palmroth is a distinguished scientist, who is recognized by multiple grants and fellowships. She was the Academy research fellow and twice winner of the ERC grant.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 10
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

The role of high-temperature superconducting wires for the energy transition

Institutskolloquium

Why We Should Be Scared of Hardware Trojans

Institutskolloquium

Global first-principle modelling for burning plasmas

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 21.05.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Alexey Mischenko
  • 1996-2002 : graduated Karazin National University, Kharkiv, Ukraine 2002-2005 : PhD in computational physics, IPP Greifswald, Otto Hahn Medal 2005-2009 : postdoc at IPP Greifswald, working on electromagnetic PIC codes since 2009 : staff at Stellarator Theory IPP Greifswald; 2012-2021 : participation in EUROfusion Enabling Research for energetic particles; starting 2021: PI of TSVV Task 10 (burning plasmas) topics of research: numerics and applicaiton of gyrokinetic PIC codes (Alfvenic instabilities in presence of fast particles, gyrokinetic modelling of MHD-type phenomena), zonal-flow dynamics in stellarators, gyrokinetic theory of pair plasmas (extensions to dipole geometry and non-neutral plasmas)
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
Realistic simulations of electromagnetic turbulence are of crucial importance to understand and predict behavior of burning plasmas before they become experimentally available. Burning plasmas are complex systems with multiple spatial and temporal scales. Electromagnetic turbulence is ubiquitous in such plasmas. It is the basic component of the ``scenery'' involving the fast-particle dynamics, the global Magneto-Hydrodynamical and Alfvenic activity, zonal flows, and transport. The saturation of the electromagnetic turbulence is a consequence of a complex interplay between these components. A single numerical first-principle framework, based on the global gyrokinetic electromagnetic formulation and including self-consistently all parts of the problem, is needed. An approach to this task based on the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes will be addressed in the presentation. Electromagnetic simulations are known to be very challenging for the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes because of the numerical stability issues related to the cancellation problem [1]. Such simulations are also very time consuming since the fast electron dynamics has to be resolved. We address the numerical stability problem using the pullback mitigation technique [2,3] for the cancellation problem. Very long simulation times normally required when the electron dynamics is resolved are substantially accelerated deploying GPUs. In our talk, we will discuss the challenges and describe results of the global gyrokinetic modelling in the electromagnetic regime. [1] Physics of Plasmas, 24(8):081206, 2017 [2] Physics of Plasmas, 21(9):092110, 2014 [3] Computer Physics Communications, 238:194–202, 2019 [mehr]

Pest und Corona: Pfade der Öffentlichen Gesundheit

Institutskolloquium

Bound states in the continuum: from quantum mechanics to nanophotonics

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 06.08.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Andrey Bogdanov
  • Andrey Bogdanov is an assistant Professor at ITMO University (St Petersburg, Russia). He is the leader of the group “Theoretical Nanophotonic”. Andrey graduated with honor from St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University in 2009. In 2012 he got a Ph.D. degree in solid-state physics at the Ioffe Insitute. His scientific interest lies in the field of nanophotonics, nonlinear optics, nanoresonators, optical forces, surface electromagnetic waves, metasurfaces, and bound states in the continuum. Andrey Bogdanov has authored more than 100 journal papers some of them entered the 1% of the most cited papers in physics in 2020. He was awarded a number of different prized, scholarships, and grants including the “Young Scientist Award” from the European Optical Society, the Leonard Euler Prize, and the award for young scientists of the Russian Academy of Science. Andrey has a huge teaching experience. He gave his first lectures on mathematical physics being a bachelor's student. He is the author of three online courses with more than 20 000 participants. Now, Andrey is the head of the international Master's program on “Nanophotonics and Metamaterials” at ITMO University. Andrey is the chair of the annual international summer school on “Nanophotonics and Metamaterials”.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
Realistic simulations of electromagnetic turbulence are of crucial importance to understand and predict behavior of burning plasmas before they become experimentally available. Burning plasmas are complex systems with multiple spatial and temporal scales. Electromagnetic turbulence is ubiquitous in such plasmas. It is the basic component of the ``scenery'' involving the fast-particle dynamics, the global Magneto-Hydrodynamical and Alfvenic activity, zonal flows, and transport. The saturation of the electromagnetic turbulence is a consequence of a complex interplay between these components. A single numerical first-principle framework, based on the global gyrokinetic electromagnetic formulation and including self-consistently all parts of the problem, is needed. An approach to this task based on the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes will be addressed in the presentation. Electromagnetic simulations are known to be very challenging for the gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes because of the numerical stability issues related to the cancellation problem [1]. Such simulations are also very time consuming since the fast electron dynamics has to be resolved. We address the numerical stability problem using the pullback mitigation technique [2,3] for the cancellation problem. Very long simulation times normally required when the electron dynamics is resolved are substantially accelerated deploying GPUs. In our talk, we will discuss the challenges and describe results of the global gyrokinetic modelling in the electromagnetic regime. [1] Physics of Plasmas, 24(8):081206, 2017 [2] Physics of Plasmas, 21(9):092110, 2014 [3] Computer Physics Communications, 238:194–202, 2019 [mehr]

The psychology of conspiracy theories

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 24.09.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragende: Prof. Karen Douglas
  • Karen Douglas is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Kent in the United Kingdom. She obtained her PhD from the Australian National University in 2000 and has worked in the United Kingdom for 20 years. She has been an associate editor and editor of several social psychology journals including the British Journal of Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, European Journal of Social Psychology, and the British Journal of Psychology. She is currently serving on the Executive Committee of the European Association of Social Psychology. To study the consequences of conspiracy theories, Karen has recently been awarded a five-year advanced grant of 2.5 million Euros from the European Research Council.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
What psychological factors drive the popularity of conspiracy theories, that explain significant events and circumstances as secret plots by malevolent groups? What are the psychological consequences of adopting these theories? In this talk, I will review research that attempts to answer these questions. First, I will outline research which suggests that belief in conspiracy theories is driven by psychological needs that can be characterised as epistemic (e.g., needing to reduce uncertainty), existential (e.g., needing to feel autonomous and in control) and social (e.g., needing to maintain a high level of self-esteem). I will then talk about some of the consequences of conspiracy theories for individuals' wellbeing and for society. [mehr]

Fundamental particle physics with high-power microwaves

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 01.10.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Akira Miyazaki
  • Akira studied plasma physics when he was an undergraduate student in the University of Tokyo from 2005, and joined LHC-CMS as a CERN summer student in 2009. During his master course, he studied particle physics at LHC-ATLAS in Tokyo. After the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, in collaboration with a gyrotron facility at Fukui University (FIR-FU), he tried to find an alternative and unique path to go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics with high-power microwaves. In 2014 at the University of Tokyo, he defended his PhD thesis about first direct measurement of positronium hyperfine structure using gyrotrons. He moved to CERN as a CERN research fellow and then was affiliated to the University of Manchester to work on response of superconductors against high-power microwaves. Since 2019, he has been working at Uppsala University as a staff researcher for superconducting particle accelerators. His present research interest is using high-power microwaves to understand objects written by either relativistic or non-relativistic quantum field theory, namely, new particle physics beyond the Standard Model and superconductors beyond the conventional theory. His research achievements include precision tests of quantum electrodynamics with high-power microwaves, investigation of surface resistance of thin-film superconductors, non-linear dynamics of trapped magnetic vortices in superconductors under strong microwaves, and superconducting accelerating cavities for protons and heavy ions. In parallel to these scientific researches, he has been leading several international projects on superconducting accelerators in Europe, such as HIE-ISOLDE, HL-LHC, and currently European Spallation Sources in Sweden. Recently, he is proposing a new international experiment for dark matter physics based on high-power microwaves.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
The Standard Model of particle physics was completed by discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. This model beautifully explains most of the experimental facts but does contradict with some important exceptions. One of the major issues of particle physics is lack of dark matter candidates in its present form, and therefore, lots of possible extensions beyond the Standard Model have been proposed, including super string theory. Such extensions naturally predict new particles which may very weakly interact with the ordinary particles in the Standard Model. Some of them can be dark matter candidates. Since an ordinary photon may couple with such hypothetical particles, new photon technology, in particular above 30 GHz, is a key to address such particles in unexplored parameter regions. In this colloquium, general introduction of this research field of particle physics will be presented, followed by two specific projects related to gyrotrons, originally developed for plasma heating and nuclear fusion. First, we will discuss precision measurement of atomic levels of positronium, a bound state of electron and position, by using gyrotrons. Secondly, direct search for new massive gauge bosons, often referred to as dark photons, with gyrotrons of frequency higher than 30 GHz, will be proposed. The latter project is under the preliminary consideration with Karlsruhe Institute for Technology to use their R&D gyrotron. In these applications for particle physics, a crucial engineering aspect is the ultimate frequency stability of gyrotrons with for example phase-lock loop and injection locking techniques. The impact of these new techniques to the fundamental physics will be described. Furthermore, ultimate limitation of classical electrodynamics for photon detection will be introduced with its remedy with superconducting quantum sensors, which is a hot topic in the particle physics community with a link to quantum computing technology. [mehr]

New developments in the use of bibliometrics in research evaluation

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 22.10.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Lutz Bornmann
  • Lutz Bornmann is a habilitated sociologist of science and works in the Administrative Headquarters of the Max Planck Society (Science Policy and Strategy Department). Besides his service activities for the Max Planck Society, he carries out research on the topic ‘research evaluation’. Here, his research interests include peer review, bibliometrics, and altmetrics. He is recipient of the Derek de Solla Price Memorial Medal in 2019. The medal is periodically awarded by the journal Scientometrics to scientists with outstanding contributions to the fields of quantitative studies of science.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
Today, bibliometrics is a standard instrument in research evaluation besides peer review. The instrument is used for assessing single researchers, research groups, institutions, countries etc. The presentation will focus on several aspects of the use of bibliometrics in research evaluation. After some basic information on bibliometrics in the first part (e.g., the difference between citizen and professional bibliometrics), the presentation will explain in more detail one of the most important type of indicators: field-normalized citation impact indicators. In the second part of the presentation, it will be shown how field-normalized citation impact indicators can be used to assess research of single researchers, institutions, and countries. In the final part, two web-based tools will be presented that can be used to assess (1) the distribution of institutional performance worldwide (see www.excellencemapping.net) and (2) the success of institutional collaboration activities worldwide (see www.excellence-networks.net). [mehr]

Ruptures in the box? Metallic melt pools, flying droplets and adhered dust in fusion devices

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 29.10.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragende: Prof. Svetlana Ratynskaia
  • Svetlana Ratynskaia is a Professor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm. Her research area is plasma physics with a focus on dusty / complex plasmas (https://www.kth.se/ee/spp/research/area/dusty-and-complex-plasmas-1.1016427) and plasma-material interactions (https://www.kth.se/ee/spp/research/area/plasma-material-interactions-1.1022875). Her research is supported by the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish National Space Agency, the ITER Organization, and the EUROfusion Consortium. She has published over 120 papers in international peer-reviewed journals, https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6712-3625.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
The interdisciplinary field of plasma material interactions encompasses all physical processes that lead to the exchange of particles, momentum and energy between plasmas and condensed matter bodies. Modelling of the interface between the plasma and the fusion reactor wall is a highly challenging task as the problem involves various aspects of disparate physics disciplines. On one side of ‘the border’, complicated plasma effects are dictated by classical electromagnetism. Near the interface, intense plasma-material interactions are governed by quantum mechanics. On the other side, the metallic melt (produced by incident heat loads) evolves according to the fluid mechanics laws. In addition to solid or liquid material boundaries surrounding plasmas, there are also dust particles, a by-product of plasma-surface interaction, whose remobilization from surfaces and collisions with the vessel are described by contact mechanics and impact mechanics. In this talk, we discuss some of the microscopic processes occurring on the plasma-material boundaries and modelling approaches for predictive studies of metallic plasma-facing component damage under energetic transient events, including the relevant issue of dust transport and in-vessel accumulation. [mehr]

QUANTUM ORIGINS OF MAGNETIC SENSING

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 03.12.2021
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Ilia A. Solov’yov
  • Professor Ilia Solov'yov received his first Ph.D. with honours in Physics from the Frankfurt University (Germany) in 2008, and later in 2009, he obtained the second Ph.D. (also in Physics) from the Ioffe Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia). He joined the Department of Physics at the University of Oldenburg in 2019 after working three years as Beckman postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA) and serving as an Associate Professor in Physics at the University of Southern Denmark (Odense, Denmark) for almost six years. Solov'yov has a strong background in theoretical and computational physics and biophysics. His research interests cover a broad range of questions on the theory of biomolecules and smart inorganic materials. Of particular interest are those biological processes that trigger energy conversion into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve chemical reactions, light absorption, formation of excited electronic states, transfer of excitation energy, and transfer of electrons and protons in chemical processes. Solov'yov is an internationally recognized scientist in the field of quantum biology with over 130 peer-reviewed publications, who carried multiple national and international fellowships and awards.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
Clearly, the laws of physics hold and are exploited in living organisms. Speaking as a physicist, most biological characteristics stem from the laws of classical physics that students learn in their first year. However, crucial characteristics in organisms are governed by quantum physics. The latter characteristics are those in which biological processes involve the jumps of electrons from one state to another. The quantum behavior of electrons covers all chemical transformations, for example it arises in optical transitions induced through light absorption by biomolecules.The mechanism by which night-migratory songbirds sense the direction of the Earth's magnetic field appears to possibly rely on the quantum spin dynamics of light-induced radical pairs in cryptochrome proteins located in the retina [1-4]. Cryptochrome binds internally the flavin cofactor (FAD), which governs it signaling through light-induced electron transfer involving a chain of four tryptophan residues, TrpA, TrpB, TrpC, TrpD. In this presentation I will review the latest experimental findings [3] that demonstrate that the photochemistry of cryptochrome 4 (CRY4) from the night-migratory European robin (Erithacus rubecula) is magnetically sensitive in vitro, and more so than CRY4 from two non-migratory bird species, chicken (Gallus gallus) and pigeon (Columba livia). Site-specific mutations of ErCRY4 reveal the roles of four successive flavin–tryptophan radical pairs in generating magnetic field effects and in stabilizing potential signaling states in a way that could enable sensing and signaling functions to be independently optimized in night-migratory birds. The experimental findings will be closely linked to the state-of-the-art computational investigations accomplished by my group in the recent years which help underpin the nature of the electron transfers and explain its unique features in the case of ErCRY4. REFERENCES[1] H. Mouritsen, Nature 558, 50 (2018). [2] D.R. Kattnig, J.K. Sowa, I.A. Solov'yov, and P.J. Hore, New J. Phys. 18 063007 (2016)[3] Xu, J., Jarocha, L.E., Zollitsch, T. et al. Nature 594, 535–540 (2021)[4] E. Sjulstok and I.A. Solov’yov, J. Phys. Chem. Lett 11, 3866 (2020) [mehr]

Present status of the NIFS-SWJTU joint project NSJP for the CFQS stellarator

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 14.01.2022
  • Uhrzeit: 09:00 - 10:30
  • Vortragender: Prof. Dr. Shoichi Okamura
  • Shoichi Okamura took his PhD in physics department in Tokyo university, Japan in 1977. He then went to the institute of plasma physics in Nagoya university for the plasma confinement research using the rf wave pondera- motive force in the cusp-mirror device. His next research career was a stellarator experiment (CHS) in the national institute for fusion science in Toki, Japan. He studied MHD stability of high beta plasmas and the transport barrier physics. He was also working for the magnetic configuration optimization of the quasi-axisymmetric stellarator. He is now working in the special program for promoting the international collaborations and the Institutional Research (IR) in the Research Enhancement Strategy Office in NIFS.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan started an international joint project for building a stellarator device in China together with a Chinese university in Chengdu city. The device name is CFQS (Chinese First Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarator) which has an advanced stellarator configuration of the quasi-axisymmetry. The device size is R = 1 m, which is appropriate for the university experiment. However, the magnetic field strength is B = 1 T for the ECH plasma production and the NBI plasma heating, for which we can plan plasma confinement experiments with the medium level of beta. The talk will describe the history of this program with reports of the present status of the device construction. The strategy and the important physics targets of the program will be also explained. [mehr]

Observation of stationary spontaneous Hawking radiation and the time evolution of an analogue black hole

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 21.01.2022
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Jeff Steinhauer
  • Prof. Jeff Steinhauer, raised in Los Angeles, earned his doctorate from UCLA and completed two post-doctoral fellowships, one under Prof. Nir Davidson at the Weizmann Institute of Science, and the other in the lab of Nobel Prize laureate Wolfgang Ketterle at MIT. He joined the physics faculty at the Technion in 2003, and in 2009 began researching acoustic black holes in his lab. Source: haaretz.com
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
We confirm the stationary character of the spontaneous Hawking radiation in an analogue black hole. Furthermore, we follow the time evolution of the Hawking radiation, and compare and contrast it with the predictions for real black holes. We observe the ramp up of the Hawking radiation, similar to a real black hole. The end of the spontaneous Hawking radiation is marked by the formation of an inner horizon. The Maryland group predicted that particles emanating from the inner horizon can cause stimulated Hawking radiation. We find that these stimulated Hawking pairs are directly observable. [mehr]

CFS and the new public-private fusion energy landscape

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 25.02.2022
  • Uhrzeit: 15:00 - 16:30
  • Vortragender: Dr. Bob Mumgaard
  • As the CEO of Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS) Bob leads the strategic vision for the company. He also serves as a key member of the technical team, leading the SPARC design process and determining how it interfaces with the business strategy. Bob performed his PhD work at MIT on Alcator C-Mod developing techniques to measure the magnetic field inside tokamak plasmas utilizing precise polarization techniques, robotics, and novel optical instruments. During this time, he contributed to the design of several small superconducting tokamaks for a variety of physics missions using high temperature superconductors (HTS). As a fellow, Bob studied the history, organization, and execution of large-scale projects in science and technology in disciplines including accelerators, telescopes, spacecraft, nuclear energy, and weapons systems. A focus of Bob’s work has been on what programmatic, technological, size, and financial pressures contribute to success or failure. This research informs the belief in the power of small, focused, diverse, entrepreneurial teams to accomplish technology breakthroughs given the right conditions. His most recent MIT-funded fellowship focused on how entrepreneurship, risk-retirement strategies, and partnerships could increase the speed of fusion from laboratory to market. Bob organized and led the SPARC Underground team, identifying strategies to utilize private finance and traditional academic resources to speed the path to fusion energy resulting in a partnership model with MIT to bridge the valley of death. He has led a culture change within the PSFC to adopt an outward-looking organization, focused on entrepreneurship and forming connections to the Boston and MIT start-up ecosystems. Source: https://mitenergyconference.org/bob-mumgaard
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
With the successful demonstration of its 20T, full-scale toroidal field model coil in September 2021, Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS) is now entering the SPARC Era. Over the next four years, CFS and its partners will build, commission and operate the SPARC net-energy tokamak. SPARC shares much of the ITER physics basis and will be capable of achieving burning plasma conditions in a parameter regime similar to ITER’s at relevant plasma timescales, such as the current relaxation and energy confinement time. In parallel, CFS will demonstrate the fusion technology advances required for the first generation of the ARC commercial fusion power plant, which is due to be commissioned in the early 2030’s.This is motivated by the market requirements of the global clean energy transition, and in particular the requirements for fusion to take its place as an industrial energy concern capable of combating climate change. CFS as a company and fusion as a technology are well positioned to reach these goals. CFS has raised over $2b in private funding to date and built a global network of over 40 partner institutions. CFS' roadmap is highly aligned with the strategic goals identified by the US fusion community and National Academy of Sciences, and is involved in multiple public-private partnerships, including many supported in part by competitive DOE awards. In addition, the experience of building, commissioning, and operating a DT-capable superconducting tokamak in the reactor-relevant regime is expected to provide significant opportunities for US contribution to international fusion programs. In this talk, CFS’ CEO, Bob Mumgaard, will present an overview of the new public-private fusion landscape, CFS’ current status and position in that landscape, and the open problems and challenges on the path to commercial fusion energy. [mehr]

A Remote Handling Solution for large Blanket Segments in DEMO

Institutskolloquium
In contrast to ITER a DEMO Reactor needs large blanket segments (5 per sector) with a thickness of > 1m, which have to be removed through a vertical upper port. Due to the fact that these blanket segments may not be drained (liquid LiPb) or in case of solid Pb as neutron multiplier cannot be drained each has a weight of 160 to 180 tones. In comparison to ITER the contamination potential is significantly larger when considering radioactive dust and Tritium. This is true for the inside of the tokamak and thus for the volume connected to the open port (Cask). However, also in contrast to ITER the activation of the blankets and thus the after heat as well as the amount of Tritium inside the components are also significantly higher. Therefore, the outgassing of Tritium during transport to the Hot Cell (Active Maintenance Facility – AMF) is much higher than in ITER. The sealing of the contamination control door (CCD) by rubber seals is not sufficient to guarantee no diffusion of Tritium to the external environment of the transport cask. Therefore, we need not only a cask-based handling system but we need a secondary containment structure which prevents contamination to spread throughout the tokamak building. In September 2020 a small team (3 to 4 persons including myself) were asked to look into this problem because no good solution has been found to this date. Due to manpower problems the work was performed on and off and in total in less than one year. In this presentation the considerations and the design solutions for a RH system for blanket segments will be presented. [mehr]

Spectroscopic methods to diagnose and optimise W7-X divertor plasmas

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 25.03.2022
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Maciej Krychowiak
  • Dr Maciej Krychowiak graduated from the University of Greifswald in 2003 with a diploma in physics and continued there with a phd, which he obtained in 2007. Maciej is now a leader of the Plasma Radiation and Spectroscopy Group. He is also an RO for the operation and/or design and upgrades of the thermal helium beam diagnostic, the divertor spectroscopy, Zeff diagnostic and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at W7-X.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 6
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
W7-X performed three experimental campaigns, the last one (OP1.2b) featuring among others high density, high power, low Zeff detached plasmas kept stable over tens of seconds. Meanwhile several tens of diagnostic systems are in operation at W7-X, quite a number of them used for spectroscopic observation of the plasma edge. Due to the inherent 3D topology of the magnetic islands plasma observation in only one poloidal plane insufficient. This results, in combination with the limited port access for plasma observation, in complex setups of diagnostic hardware and analysis tools. Selected diagnostic methods based on passive and active spectroscopy will be presented together with their implementation at W7-X and with the information they provide about important parameters determining the W7-X island divertor plasma behaviour. Moreover, some of the spectroscopic signals were used in the last campaign as input for feedback-controlled gas injection. Results of the precise control and stabilisation of the detached plasma state over the longest high-power detached discharge in W7-X, to date, will be presented. [mehr]

From Fear to Spin: How Dictatorship is Changing

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 13.05.2022
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Sergei Guriev
  • Sergei Guriev joined the Department in 2013 and since 2019, he is the Scientific Director of Sciences Po's Master's and PhD programmes in economics. He is a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and member of the Executive Committee of the International Economic Association. In 2016-19, he served as the Chief Economist at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. Dr. Guriev’s research interests include contract theory, corporate governance, political economics and labour mobility. Dr. Guriev has published in international refereed journals including American Economic Review, Journal of European Economic Association, Journal of Economic Perspectives and American Political Science Review. Prior to joining Sciences Po, Sergei GURIEV Dr. Guriev visited the Department of Economics at M.I.T. for a one-year post-doctoral placement in 1997-98, and in 2003-2004, the Department of Economics at Princeton University as a Visiting Assistant Professor. In 1999-2013, he was on the faculty of the New Economic School in Moscow, in 2004-13 being a tenured faculty member and Rector of the New Economic School. Sergei GURIEV received his Dr. Sc. (habilitation degree) in Economics (2002) and PhD in Applied Math from the Russian Academy of Science (1994), and M.Sc. Summa Cum Laude from the Moscow Institute of Physics in Technology (1993). Source: https://www.sciencespo.fr/department-economics/en/researcher/sergei-guriev.html
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
In the colloquium lecture I will explain how leaders such as Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew and Peru’s Alberto Fujimori pioneered less violent, more covert, and more effective methods of monopolizing power. They cultivated an image of competence, concealed censorship, and used democratic institutions to undermine democracy, all while increasing international engagement for financial and reputational benefits. We will discuss why most of today’s authoritarians are spin dictators—and how they differ from the remaining “fear dictators” such as Kim Jong-un and Bashar al-Assad, as well as from masters of high-tech repression like Xi Jinping.I will attempt to explain some of the great political puzzles of our time—from how dictators can survive in an age of growing modernity to the disturbing convergence and mutual sympathy between dictators and populists like Donald Trump. [mehr]

World hunger for energy is there ! Can fission and fusion contribute? What about their respective nuclear waste issues?

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 20.05.2022
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Hamid Aït Abderrahim
  • Prof. Dr. Hamid Aït Abderrahim is the Deputy Director-General of SCK•CEN , the Belgian nuclear research center. He lectures reactor physics and nuclear engineering at the "Université Catholique de Louvain" (UCLouvain) at the mechanical engineering department of the "Ecole Polytechnique de Louvain (EPL )". Since 1998, he is the director of the MYRRHA project, an accelerator driven system (ADS) coupling a sub-critical Pb-Bi cooled reactor and a high power proton linear accelerator through a spallation target. He is or has been coordinator of various projects of the European Commission framework programme related to advanced nuclear systems and the advanced nuclear fuel cycle. He is member of various scientific councils or research organisations or international institutes such as: • Member of the National Council of the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office • Past-Chairman of SNETP - Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform • Member of the Scientific Council of LabEx P2IO (Laboratoire d’Excellence de Physiques des 2 Infinis et des Origines en France) • Member of the International Advisory Committee of J-PARC: Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex • Vice-Chair of the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) of OECD/NEA • Member of the Scientific Council of EDF (Electricité de France) • Member of the Belgian section of the World Energy Council • Member of the Scientific Councils of the Nuclear Research Center of Birine of COMENA in Algeria He is author of more than 100 scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals and international conferences. In February 2015 he received the title of Doctor Honoris Causa at the Kaunas University of Technology in Lithuania for his personal achievements and his long term collaboration with the Kaunas University of Technology and more specifically with the Baršauskas Ultrasound Research Institute. He is very engaged in the socio cultural world actif in the exchange with the South such as the Aïn El Kheir Club which he started himself in 2015 and also chairs and various associations linked to the Algerian community in Belgium and Luxemburg. Last but not least in April 2014, he has been honoured by the King of Belgium by nominating him as “Grand Officer in the Crown Order” for his contributions in the scientific representation of Belgium in the field of nuclear energy science and closing the fuel cycle.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
SCK•CEN is at the forefront of Heavy Liquid Metal (HLM) nuclear technology worldwide with the development of the MYRRHA accelerator driven system (ADS). MYRRHA is serving since the FP5 EURATOM framework as the backbone of the P&T strategy of the European Commission based on the "4 building Blocks at Engineering level" and fostering the R&D activities in EU related to the ADS and the associated HLM technology developments. At the same time MYRRHA is conceived as a flexible fast-spectrum pool-type research irradiation facility cooled by Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE), and was identified by SNETP (www.snetp.eu) as the European Technology Pilot Plant for the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor. MYRRHA is proposed to the international community of nuclear energy and nuclear physics as a pan-European large research infrastructure to serve as a multipurpose fast spectrum irradiation facility for various fields of research such as; transmutation of High Level Waste (HLW), material and fuel research for Gen.IV reactors, material for fusion energy, innovative radioisotopes development and production and for fundamental physics. As such MYRRHA is since 2010 on the high priority list of the ESFRI roadmap (http://www.esfri.eu/roadmap-2016). Since 1998 SCK•CEN is developing the MYRRHA project as an accelerator driven system based on the lead-bismuth eutectic as a coolant of the reactor and a material for its spallation target. The nominal design power of the MYRRHA reactor is 100 MWth. It is driven in sub-critical mode (keff = 0.95) by a high power proton accelerator based on LINAC technology delivering a proton beam in Continuous Wave (CW) mode of 600 MeV proton energy and 4 mA intensity. The choice of LINAC technology is dictated by the unprecedented reliability level required by the ADS application. In the MYRRHA requirements the proton beam delivery should be guaranteed with a number of beam trips lasting more than 3 seconds limited to maximum 10 for a period of 3 months corresponding to the operating cycle of the MYRRHA facility. Since 2015, SCK•CEN and Belgium government decided to implement the MYRRHA facility in three phases to minimize the technical risks associated to the needed accelerator reliability. On September 7, 2018 the Belgian federal government decided to build this large research infrastructure. In this lecture we will present the status of the MYRRHA project as a whole and in particular stressing the role of Accelerator Driven Systems in closing efficiently the nuclear fuel cycle and burning the Minor Actinides for reducing the radiotoxicity burden in the high level storage. [mehr]

Computer simulation vs. machine learning – a philosophical comparison

Institutskolloquium

Intermittent electricity generation and the consequences for Germany

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 16.09.2022
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. F. Wagner
  • Friedrich Wagner was born on 16 November 1943 in Pfaffenhofen (Swabia). After studying physics and taking his PhD at the Technical University of Munich in 1972, Wagner then went as a postdoc to Ohio State University, where he did research in the field of low-temperature physics from 1973 to 1974. In 1975 he joined Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, being made head of the ASDEX tokamak experiment in 1986 and appointed Scientific Fellow in 1988. Wagner qualified for lectureship in the same year at the University of Heidelberg, where he held a teaching post till 1991. That year he became Honorary Professor at the Technical University of Munich. From 1989 till 1993 he has been project head of the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator experiment. From 1993 to 2005 he was member of the Directorate of IPP, from March 1999 till April 2007 Speaker of the Greifswald Branch Institute and from 2003 till 2005 head of the "Wendelstein 7-X Enterprise". In 1987 he was awarded the "Excellency in Plasma Physics" prize by the Plasma Physics Division of the American Physical Society, in 2007 the Hannes Alfvén Prize of the European Physical Society. In 2008 he has been awarded the Stern-Gerlach Medal 2009 by the German Physical Society. Since 1999 he is Ordinary Professor at the Ernst-Moritz Arndt University in Greifswald. Besides his institute commitments, Wagner was from 1996 till 2004 Chairman of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, from 2007 till 2009 he was President of the European Physical Society. Wagner is Honorary Member of the Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg, Fellow of the Institute of Physics of the American Physical Society, and Member of the Editorial Board at the Institute of Physics. He retired end of 2008.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
There is tremendous public concern about an upcoming energy crisis in Europe and specifically in Germany. I will first assess the actual situation of Germany using, as basis, the “energy triangle” – security of supply, affordability, and sustainability. The options for future clean energy forms are rather limited. It is obvious that renewable energies will play an important role in the future supply mix. This is the reason why their intrinsic properties and limitations have to be presented and discussed in detail – under what circumstances are renewable energies sustainable, what are their limitations (e.g. of biomass), what are the technical consequences of the intermittent nature of wind and photo-voltaic power, what is the national potential of renewable energies of Germany, what are the electricity import options within Europe, is a storage system devoted exclusively to electricity meaningful, what is the possible role of hydrogen and how much electricity and energy can Germany produce by itself. The political plans for the German supply in 2030 and the role of methane for the transition period of the “Energiewende” will be discussed. At the end, if there is still time, I will try to confront the local energy problems with a more global perspective. [mehr]

Optomechanics with quantum vacuum fluctuations

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 18.11.2022
  • Uhrzeit: 15:00 - 16:30
  • Vortragende: Dr. Zhujing Xu
  • Zhujing Xu received her B.S. in Physics from University of Science and Technology of China in 2016. After that, she joined Prof. Tongcang Li’s group at Purdue University and received her Ph.D. in Physics in 2022. During her Ph.D., she has worked on optomechanics and solid-state spins, both in experiment and theory. Her thesis work focused on building Casimir devices and realizing quantum vacuum mediated energy transfer between mechanical oscillators. Currently, she is a postdoctoral fellow working in Prof. Marko Loncar’s group at Harvard University. She is interested in spin-phonon interactions in diamond resonators and optomechanical crystals.
  • Ort: Zoom Meeting Room 1
  • Raum: Zoom Meeting
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
Random quantum vacuum fluctuations exist everywhere leading to the Casimir interaction between macroscopic bodies. The Casimir effect can dominate the interaction between microstructures at small separations, and hence a device that can leverage the Casimir force is in demand. In this talk, I will present the first Casimir diode and Casimir transistor system. For the Casimir diode system, we realize the first experimental demonstration of quantum vacuum mediated non-reciprocal energy transfer between two micromechanical oscillations. For the Casimir transistor system, we observe the three-body Casimir effects experimentally for the first time and demonstrate switching and amplifying quantum-fluctuation-mediated energy transfer in a three-terminal Casimir system. These two works represent an important development in optomechanics with virtual photons and will have potential applications in sensing and information processing. [mehr]

How music making changes brain function and stucture: Music making as a model for functional and dysfunctional neuroplasticity

Institutskolloquium

Quantum correlations in quantum causal structures

Institutskolloquium

Ultrafast laser technology. From experimental setup for dark matter detection to a commercial product.

Institutskolloquium

Sustainable Steel Making

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 31.03.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Dr. Dierk Raabe
  • Dierk Raabe is director of the Department for Microstructure Physics, Alloy Design and Sustainable Synthesis of Materials at Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Düsseldorf and professor at RWTH Aachen
  • Ort: Zoom
  • Raum: Zoom
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: daniel.told@ipp.mpg.de

What is a complex system – And what does mathematics teach us about the dynamics of democracies?

Institutskolloquium

Advancing the Concept of the Quasi-isodynamic Stellarator

Institutskolloquium

Persönliche Erinnerungen zur Geschichte der Fusionsforschung

Institutskolloquium

The physics basis for a Q≈1 high-field, compact, axisymmetric mirror*

Institutskolloquium

Proxima Fusion’s stellarator reactor program

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 16.06.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Francesco Sciortino
  • Francesco is a co-founder and CEO of Proxima Fusion, a startup headquartered in Munich working on QI stellarators. Following his undergraduate studies at Imperial College and EPFL, Francesco did his PhD at MIT, working on spectroscopy and particle transport in tokamaks. He then joined IPP to do research on divertor spectroscopy and reduced edge modeling at ASDEX Upgrade. In 2022, he was one the EuroFusion Scientific Coordinators for negative triangularity, considered a potential path to tokamak power plants. In January 2023, Francesco and his co-founders co-founded Proxima Fusion to pursue a new path with public-private partnerships to develop QI stellarators in Europe.
  • Ort: IPP Greifswald
  • Raum: Günter-Grieger Lecture Hall (Greifswald) and Zoom
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Ignition and the Path Towards an Inertial Fusion Energy Future

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 29.06.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragende: Dr. Tammy Ma
  • Tammy Ma is the Lead for the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Institutional Initiative at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the U.S. She was a member of the team achieving burning plasma, followed by fusion ignition in December 2022 at the National Ignition Facility, demonstrating more energy gain from fusion than the laser energy used to drive it. She is the recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering (PECASE) and currently sits on the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC). She also chaired the 2022 DOE Basic Research Needs Workshop and Report in Inertial Fusion Energy and served on the German Expert Panel that authored the Memorandum on Laser Inertial Fusion Energy.
  • Ort: IPP Garching
  • Raum: Arnulf-Schlüter Lecture Hall in Building D2 and Zoom
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: karl.krieger@ipp.mpg.de

Alternative Divertor Configurations in the New Upper Divertor of ASDEX Upgrade

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 14.07.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Tilmann Lunt
  • Tilmann Lunt is a research scientist in the Plasma Edge and Wall Department (E2M) at IPP Garching. His scientific interests include alternative divertor configurations and the physics of the plasma edge, in particular the effects of 3D magnetic field perturbations. He is also responsible for the visual and near-infrared camera systems of the ASDEX Upgrade experiment.
  • Ort: IPP Garching
  • Raum: Arnulf-Schlüter Lecture Hall in Building D2 and Zoom
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: karl.krieger@ipp.mpg.de

Laser-driven inertial confinement fusion: principles, status and perspective for energy production after the achievement of ignition at the NIF

Institutskolloquium

From Data to Discovery: Harnessing AI in Medicine for Improved Patient Care

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 22.09.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Lars Kaderali
  • Prof. Koderali is a director of the Institute for Bioinformatics at Greifswald University. He made his master in computer science in the University of Cologne in 2001 and got his PhD from the same university in bioinformatics in 2006. He worked in Heidelberg and Dresden before acquiring a chair of bioinformatics in Greifswald in 2015. He serves as an editor in PLoS one and a chief editor in Frontiers in Virology. He was a member of the expert council in COVID-19of the German Federal Chancellor.
  • Ort: IPP Greifswald
  • Raum: Günter-Grieger-Lecture Hall (Greifswald)
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

The rise of the private fusion industry and how Kyoto Fusioneering accelerates fusion power on the grid

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 29.09.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Colin Baus
  • Colin is a physicist with a PhD at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (CMS experiment) on heavy-ion cross sections and the connection to astroparticle physics. As co-author of the hadronic interaction tool CRMC, he has deep knowledge in nuclear physics. After several years in the private industry, Colin joined Kyoto Fusioneering. Here, he is author of the high-temperature fusion blanket SCYLLA design and currently oversees technical development of the UNITY programme for fusion thermal cycle and fusion fuel cycle in Japan. He is also a visiting researcher at Kyoto University.
  • Ort: IPP Greifswald
  • Raum: Günter-Grieger-Lecture Hall (Greifswald)
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

How Cybercrime challenges Criminal Law

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 06.10.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Florian Nicolai
  • Dr. Florian Nicolai, Akademischer Rat a.Z. at the FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg, passed the first state examination in 2017. He completed his legal clerkship at the Higher Regional Court of Nuremberg (OLG Nürnberg) with the second state examination in 2019. From 2019 to 2023 he was part of the Research Training Group 2475 “Cybercrime and Forensic Computing” funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG). Within the context of his research in the Research Training Group he was a guest researcher at the Swedish Law and Informatics Research Center (Stockholm University) in 2022, where he continues to give guest lectures. In 2023 he received a doctorate in law with a thesis on the impact of the Internet of Things on Criminal Law (Duncker&Humblot, in press). His doctoral thesis was awarded with the doctoral prize of the Department of Law of the FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg. In his current position as a postdoc Nicolai is involved in teaching as well as research. He is the author of several legal essays, comments on judgements, contributions to anthologies and other publications. Together with Prof. Dr. Mustafa Temmuz Oğlakcıoğlu (Saarland University) he founded the podcast "Räuberischer Espresso", which is published by the legal educational magazine "Juristische Arbeitsblätter".
  • Ort: IPP Greifswald
  • Raum: Günter-Grieger-Lecture Hall (Greifswald)
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Where do most black holes in the Universe come from?

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 01.12.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Dr. Hans-Walter Rix
  • Hans-Walter Rix is director at the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) and professor at the University of Heidelberg faculty for physics and astronomy. In his thesis work with Simon White he figured out that most large elliptical galaxies also have sizable stellar disks, and hence must have a different formation history than thought at the time. He also had the opportunity to work with Craig Hogan on gravitational lensing, with Marcia and George Rieke on infrared imaging and spectroscopy, and with Rob Kennicutt. He then went on to the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, working on some of the very first Hubble Space Telescope data on gravitational lensing and giving in to the numerous, exciting scientific diversions that Princeton has to offer. After a year at MPA, Garching and three years on the faculty at the University of Arizona, he came to MPIA late 1998. In the first five years, his focus was on galaxy evolution, helping to draw up a comprehensive picture of what the population of galaxies looked like when the Universe was half its age. In recent years he has focused his research on our very own galaxy, the Milky Way, because the intricate detail in which it can be studied, should lead us to a better understanding of galaxy formation as a whole. As of 2016, the Gaia space mission along with other vast spectroscopic surveys of stars, and then Hubble's successor James Webb Space Telescope are the next beacons on his science path.
  • Ort: IPP Garching
  • Raum: Arnulf-Schlüter Lecture Hall in Building D2 and Zoom
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: karl.krieger@ipp.mpg.de

Largest and smallest differentiable computers

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 08.12.2023
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Alexander Mordvintsev
  • Alexander Mordvintsev is holding a research scientist position at Google. His current work is focused on Artificial Life and principles of Self-Organizing Systems Design. The very first, and probably the most advanced skill that every living creature masters from the moment of inception is the ability to build and maintain its own body. This happens through collective behavior of countless tiny locally integrating agents pursuing their own goals. Alexander is looking to apply lessons from Differentiable Programming (aka Deep Learning) to create systems based on these principles that are able to act according to a provided specification or objective. This effort was triggered by the presentation “What Bodies Think About” that Prof. Michael Levin gave at NeurIPS 2018. Previously Alexander worked on understanding deep neural networks by inspecting the computational circuits and their dynamics emerging during training. This work was started after joining Google in 2014 when he got introduced to the modern generation of differentiable machine learning models. DeepDream was probably the most known artifact produced by this line of his research that flooded the internet with psychedelic dog-slug images in summer 2015. Before joining Google Alexander worked in St.Petersburg, Russia on various 3D computer vision and simulation applications. He studied computer science in St.Petersburg State University of Information Technology, Mechanics and Optics. During the late university years he participated in Google Summer of Code program twice, working on Python integration for OpenCV computer vision library. As a part of his research, Alexander created a number of artistic projects exploring the themes of self-organization and the beauty of inner mechanics of artificial neural systems. Featured works (2023) SwissGL minimalistic web graphics library Self-Organising Systems (2023) Isotropic Neural Cellular Automata (2022) Particle Lenia and the energy-based formulation (2021) ​​Self-Organising Textures (tweet) (2020) Self-classifying MNIST Digits (tweet) (2020) Growing Neural Cellular Automata (tweet) DeepDream, Neural Network Visualization and Interpretability: (2018) The Building Blocks of Interpretability (2018) Differentiable Image Parameterizations (2017) Feature Visualization (2015) DeepDream (code) Featured Art Hexells (SIGGRAPH’2021, Leicester AI Art festival) deepdream.c Neverendeing story music video (with Perforated Cerebral Party) Featured mentions (2020) DeepDream: How Alexander Mordvintsev Excavated the Computer’s Hidden Layers by Arthur I. Miller (MIT Press) (2016) How computers are learning to be creative by Blaise Agüera y Arcas (TED talk) (2015) Inside Deep Dreams: How Google Made Its Computers Go Crazy by Steven Levy (Wired)
  • Ort: IPP Greifswald
  • Raum: Günter-Grieger Lecture Hall (Greifswald) and Zoom
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

The Spherical Tokamak Path to Fusion – New Challenges

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 12.01.2024
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Dr. Mikhail Gryaznevich
  • Mikhail Gryaznevich, M.Sc., Ph.D., Fellow of the Institute of Physics, Chartered Physicist. Born 1954 in Leningrad, received Honours Diploma in Plasma Physics at the Leningrad University in 1977 and PhD in Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion in 1988 at Ioffe Institute. Since 1990, he has been working at the Culham Laboratory, UK, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority on START, MAST and JET tokamaks, leading experimental programmes, preparing and performing experiments, designing, constructing and operating tokamak systems and diagnostics, supervising students, scientific and engineering staff. Supervised and participated in design, assembly and commissioning of START and MAST tokamaks and their systems. Performed experiments on 21 tokamaks and stellarators, including JET, MAST, START, ST25, ST25HTS, ST40 (UK), AUG (Germany), DIII-D, NSTX, HIDRA (USA), JT-60U, TST-2, (Japan), VEST (Korea), T-10, TUMAN-3 (Russia), COMPASS, GOLEM (Czech Rep), ETE, TCABR (Brazil), STOR-2M (Canada), TJ-2 (Spain), supervising and participating in experiments. Worked for IAEA Co-ordinated Research Projects, chairing the Scientific Committee on Small Fusion Devices, co-ordinating international activities in this area, organising IAEA International Joint experiments. Since 2009 he is the Chief Scientist and Executive Director at Tokamak Energy Ltd, working on ST path to Fusion Power and the use of the high temperature superconductors (HTS) in Fusion magnets. He was playing a leading role in construction and operations of a compact high-field spherical tokamak ST40 and in conceptual design of the ST-based Fusion Pilot Plant.
  • Ort: IPP Garching und Greifswald
  • Raum: Günter-Grieger Lecture Hall (Greifswald) and Zoom
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de

Fusion start-ups - A broad range of alternatives

Institutskolloquium

The New Approach to the European Roadmap to Fusion Energy

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 21.02.2024
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Dr. Ambrogio Fasoli
  • Ambrogio Fasoli is Programme Manager (CEO) of the European Consortium for Fusion Energy, EUROfusion, Director of the Swiss Plasma Centre at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Delegate to the Provost of the EPFL. Ambrogio Fasoli, an honorary member of the American Physical Society, studied at the University of Milan and obtained his doctorate at the EPFL. After conducting experiments on the European JET tokamak in the United Kingdom, he became a professor at MIT in the United States, where he worked from 1997 to 2001, before being appointed professor at EPFL. From 2014 to 2020, he was editor-in-chief of the journal Nuclear Fusion of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).
  • Ort: IPP Garching
  • Raum: Arnulf-Schlüter Lecture Hall in Building D2 and Zoom
  • Gastgeber: IPP
  • Kontakt: karl.krieger@ipp.mpg.de

Photonic Terahertz Systems

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 15.03.2024
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Prof. Dr. Idelfonso Tafur Monroy
  • Idelfonso Tafur Monroy obtained his MSc from Saint Petersburg University of Telecommunications (Russia) in 1992 and his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in 1999. He also took courses at Stockholm University (Sweden), KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden) and Utrecht University. Tafur Monroy worked as Assistant Professor in Electro-Optical Communications at TU/e from 1999 to 2006, after which he became Associate Professor and later Full Professor at DTU Fotonik (Denmark). In the meantime, Tafur Monroy also worked at Beijing University of Post and Telecommunications (China), UC Berkeley (USA) and ITMO University (Russia) as visiting professor. Tafur Monroy founded Bifrost Communications in 2015. In 2017, he returned to TU/e to become Full Professor in the Electrooptical Communication (ECO) group of the electrical engineering department and to join the Institute for Photonic Integration. He is currently the leader of the team Quantum and Terahertz Systems (QTS) within the ECO group.
  • Ort: IPP Garching
  • Raum: Günter-Grieger Lecture Hall (Greifswald) and Zoom
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
In this talk we review the increasing interest on Terahertz Systems ranging from 6G wireless data links to radar systems for autonomous driving and sensing and radiometers. We discuss and elaborate on the role of photonic technologies and the road towards systems-on-hip. [mehr]

The Basic Concepts of Quantum Computing

Institutskolloquium
  • Datum: 12.04.2024
  • Uhrzeit: 10:30 - 12:00
  • Vortragender: Dr. Ulrich Meier
  • Ulrich Meier studied Chemistry at the Universities of Bochum, Germany and St. Andrews, Scotland. He received a PhD in Quantum Chemistry at the University of Bochum 1988. Before joining IQM Quantum Computers he worked for almost 30 years as a High Performance Computing expert for companies like Convex Computers, Silicon Graphics, Sun Microsystems and Go Virtual Germany. Ulrich’s responsibilities evolved from performance benchmarking and system architectures to marketing and market development.
  • Ort: IPP Greifswald
  • Raum: HGW S2
  • Gastgeber: Dmitry Moseev
  • Kontakt: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de
In this quantum computing lecture the definition of Qubits is given and which basic operations are done and useful on single Qubits. This leads to 2 Qubit logical gates and the implementation of the simplest quantum algorithms. Quantum error definition and the methodology of error correction conclude the algorithmic part of the talk. The quality and the benchmark of quantum computers is discussed in the second part of the lecture. [mehr]
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